The Davis-Bacon Act: Job killing Since 1931

Takia Hollowell, Contributor

Ever drive by a construction site and wonder, “Why aren’t very many blacks visible in this industry?”  During my lifetime, I’ve heard this question asked quite a bit.  I’ve heard the notorious Al Sharpton recently rant against this epidemic and demand that construction sites without blacks be shut down.  Even Harry Alford-I of the Black Chamber of Commerce has stated: “It is more than 44 years since the Civil Rights Act, and the construction trades are no better today than they were during the struggles of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” If you’re wondering why jobs of this nature aren’t very prevalent in urban areas, then look no further than to the monstrosity of the Davis-Bacon Act.   BRIEF HISTORY The upheaval of the Davis-Bacon Act began in 1927 after a contractor from Alabama secured a bid to build a Veteran’s hospital in Long Island, NY.  As it was discovered that the contractor brought black construction workers from Alabama to conduct the work; Representative Robert Bacon was disturbed to see “coloreds” take work away from “white labor” in his district.  Being that unions were created to keep blacks out of the workforce during those times, Representative Bacon developed legislation that would force contractors to pay its employees the prevailing/union wage in order to secure a federal contract. (See: US Congress House Committee of Labor, Letter of Ethelbert Stewart, pg 17, March 6, 1930)  The intention was to put a stop to black labor from constantly outbidding higher paid white unions in securing federal contracts. Read the full article here…

Trackbacks for this post

  1. […] throwing crazed tantrums like a meth addict who can’t get find their pipe.  Our government’s love of our money is dangerous and has torn this country to pieces… quite literally the Bible’s warning manifest -Washington’s […]

  2. […] party activist C.L.Bryant. The discussion centered issues of concern in the Black community such as high unemployment, abortion and incarceration rates.  “The conservative voice in the black community remains […]

  3. […] party activist C.L.Bryant. The discussion centered issues of concern in the Black community such as high unemployment, abortion and incarceration rates.  “The conservative voice in the black community remains […]

  4. […] throwing crazed tantrums like a meth addict who can’t get find their pipe.  Our government’s love of our money is dangerous and has torn this country to pieces… quite literally the Bible’s warning manifest -Washington’s […]

Leave a Comment